A 13-year-old science entrepreneur wants to bring his waterproofing device to marketing: NPR



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Gitanjali Rao is a 13-year-old Rao with his named search engine named Tethys. Rao was named the largest young scientist in America in 2017 and one of Forbes 30 by 30 in 2019.

Michael Esalas Sakas / CPR News


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Michael Esalas Sakas / CPR News

Gitanjali Rao is a 13-year-old Rao with his named search engine named Tethys. Rao was named the largest young scientist in America in 2017 and one of Forbes 30 by 30 in 2019.

Michael Esalas Sakas / CPR News

Gitanjali Rao is already on the 2019 Forbes 30 under 30 list and is still not yet taken to secondary school.

In 2017, the name was 11 years from Lone Tree, Colo. Designation as a Best & Best Young Scientist in America & # 39; for the design of a small, mobile device for lead in drinking water.

Rao has not stopped there. It is now assisted by scientists in the water industry to create a prototype of the device that may be on the device; market at the end.

Raw's name is Tethys's name, after the Titanian day of Greece's clean water. The 3D Print box is about the size of a card deck and there is battery, bluetooth and carbon nanotubes. Rao has read the idea of ​​how technology can look like a dangerous gas detector in the air. Her current response was "why not use nanotube carbon sensors to find a lead in water?"

Flint's water emergency is the reason behind the invention.

Rao remembers having a & # 39; Looking at parents trying to prove their drinking water with a tested probe at home. The results were undoubtedly and non-trustworthy. Alternatively, choose the option of a water sample.

"[Tethys] for people who do not know what they are in their water from the pipes that go to their house. My target market is currently people in their homes as well as schools, "said Rao.

Here's how it works: carbon atoms will connect in the beehive format and its; A connection to creating tube – nanotube. The carbon nanotubs respond to changes in the electricity stream. If there is a lead in the water, the lead causes the carbon ion, and creating anti-bad. Tethys appellants that oppose, and a & # 39; submit the data to a smartphone app to give a lead in water quality.

Selene Hernandez-Ruiz, a managing manager at Denver Water, has worked with Rao to prove and develop her device. The two began to work together after inviting Rao to take a tour of Denver Water resources.

Rao works with Dr. Selena Hernandez-Ruiz, a labor manager at Denver Water, to create a prototype of his lead-looking device.

Michael Esalas Sakas / CPR News


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Michael Esalas Sakas / CPR News

Rao works with Dr. Selena Hernandez-Ruiz, a labor manager at Denver Water, to create a prototype of his lead-looking device.

Michael Esalas Sakas / CPR News

Hernandez-Ruiz told Rao that she could return if she wanted to use the laboratory. The 13-year-old was erased, "I asked, can I come here, like every day?"

Hernandez-Ruiz and Rao gather around once a month to work on the device and the results.

"Nowadays, I look alongside other chemicals in water rather than steering," said Rao. "How, yes [the carbon] Does Fluoride Connect Badly? So that's what I'm trying to deal with. "

Hernandez-Ruiz is delighted to help women with color. encouraging enthusiasm for science.

"It's so hopeful to see the next generation that is going on," she said. "With a desire to increase and test those boundaries that we sometimes want we do not want to approach."

Rao is grateful for her the opportunity given to her to continue to work on her device.

"My mother did not let me use lead in the backyard," said Rao with a smile. "This enables me to take it [Tethys] out there. I know that my device can be right. "

Rao hopes to get a prototype on the world in the next two years. In the meantime, she completes the engine's notes book with new ideas.

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