Armed veterans of the Russian soldier were dead; A continuation of research into Christchurch's terror links continued



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An old soldier of the Russian army died in suspicion that he had committed suicide as an armed police brought round his Christchurch car by having two-day talks with officers, appearing in court papers.

Artemiy Vldimirovich Dubovskiy, known as Troy Dubovskiy, also died early in the early hours of Wednesday after more than three hours with the police.

Police Commissioner Mike Bush said in a statement that Dubovskiy was investigating the threat of Christchurch's attacks in March 15 but added that there was no evidence to suggest this.

54-year-old Dubovskiy who became a member of the Russian special forces of Afghanistan and Chechnya arrived in New Zealand in 1997. t

The police found Dubovskiy inside a Mitsubishi Pajero with a necessary stroke wound. Photograph / Dean Purcell
The police found Dubovskiy inside a Mitsubishi Pajero with a necessary stroke wound. Photograph / Dean Purcell

At the age of 35, he was found guilty of a jury trial at Christchurch District Court concerning serious bullying and illegal possession of guns.

He got a sentence of four years in prison.

Dubovskiy was a Russian couple he knew with him.

When their pair returned to their home on 22 October 1999 they noted signs of an attacker.

Later, Duovskiy's army and balaclava-clad faced the Russians.

Dubovskiy looked after Luger's replica, a German daga that was famous for use during the Second World War, at the head of the man.

Believing that the pistol would be true, the man was fighting with Dubovskiy for the gun before he escaped with his wife.

Information was sent to the Squaders' Armed Squad (AOS), but Dubovskiy up to two days later did not comply with the police with the help of a friend and his father.

Reporting to the police, Dubovskiy admitted that he was the savior but he did not remember many of the events as he was drunk.

Dubovskiy has several other convictions, including gun crime and attacking a police officer, and was on bail at the time of the home attack.

He had his last person in June 2013, the jury Herald understand.

Father Dubovskiy, Vlad Dubovskiy, tells Newbub after the death of his son: "What I know is that my son was the relief." [guns] – only from a technical point of view. "

He denied that his son was involved in the March 15 attacks, or with a link to the accused Brenton Tarrant, the accused.

"It's the rubbish. He had never been a terrorist. He was a good man," he said.

The armed police were keeping watch over his palace after Dubovskiy stood up for the police. Photograph / Dean Purcell
The armed police were keeping watch over his palace after Dubovskiy stood up for the police. Photograph / Dean Purcell

Before Dubovskiy's death, Bush said officers had plundered St Martins's building late Tuesday and found several guns after their death from public.

The police then stopped a car with Dubovskiy within the Richmond Park area at around 12.30pm.

The Police Settlement Team spoke to him as the police helicopter and AOS were deployed.

Members of the public who heard explosions heard police used gas, the commissioner explained.

At around 3.40am, the police went into the Mitsubishi Pajero and managed to get Dubovskiy badly by looking like a stab lot. A knife was placed in the carriage, but there was no guns.

First aid was given instantly, but Dubovskiy died at the sight.

His jeep, was surveyed by the New Zealand government's plastic waste team as a warning but he was deemed safe.

"A high priority inquiry has started to establish whether the person who died was a threat to the community," Bush said.

"This will include research as well as Christchurch's features and interviews with family and colleagues."

Notification to the Independent Police Authority Authority.

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