ISSs see Canada today



ISS View: The Milky Way, also the Terrestrial atmosphere, is here from the International Spey Station in September 2015. The Scott Kelly Astronaut illustrates this 135th aboard aboard. (NASA)

ISS, the International Spey Station, will be featured in the night's skyline over Canada tonight, with David Saint-Jacques is now aboard.

Many of the Canadians were moving to satellite in the low orbit of Monday, along with the U.S. platform. Anna McClain and the Russian logo Oleg Kononenko.

They welcomed the other three aboard: German Gerst Alexander Gerst, Serena Aunon-Chancellor and Sergey Prokopyev na Ruise.

ISS was saying: David Saint-Jacques just before the leadership of his six-month mission was aboard the International Spanish Station.

Saint Jacques was recruited to the program in 2009 and this is the first time to the place.

The Canadian Governor, Julie Payette, is on a work trip to Kazakhstan, who allowed them to attend the launch from Baikonur on MondaySouth Westerly

Payette, asthma from 1992 to 2013, Two space missions: STS-96 in 1999 and STS-127 in 2009.

She also served many years as CAPCOM (Communicator Capsule) at the NASA Mission Control Center in Houston, Texas, and was a leading supporter for the Canadian Spaniard.

One of the most obvious things in the air, the ISS will be visible in the early afternoon, for the next weeks over Canada.

Andrew Fazekas, a science journalist, also known as Night Sky Guy, recommends the following link if you are interested in a & # 39; understand when you look up and where:

https://heavens-above.com/main.aspx

If you have problems with that site, the CIC scientist, Nicole Mortillaro, will give ideas in a & # 39; her piece of her mission; at the moment in the workout.

For example, "In Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal, if the sky is clear, it's about 5:12 pm ET for a five minute pass. Although this is not a very clear pass, it's easy to see the spot He goes across the Dipper at 5:14 pm, "she's a writing.

The ISS will hear about 28,968 km / h (18,000 miles).

(With files from NASA and CBC)


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