'I feel bullied & # 39 ;: Stopping unhindered children happening prey



Some of the parents who had been against their child had introduced the vaccination rudely for an outbreak of shooting which was burned on Wednesday (US time) as a result of an incident t crisis in a county in the far north of New York.

Rockland County took the emergency order on Saturday night to fight the belly with the measles which had made more than 150 people from the previous fall. The order takes people from 18 years of age to have no pass from public places such as schools, sources and churches.

Loreen Costa told the Rockland Journal News that she gave her son to their piper for a Wednesday vaccination after he had been robbing his school from their school. School areas contacted parents about moneyless children and told them not to attend Wednesday classes.

Lainie Goldstein of Grandview said that her middle principal summoned her son and said the boy cannot go to school until he has been immunized. She said she chose not to be given a vaccine because she did not want to "injure" him, but she took it to the children's chest for the injection.

"I feel like I'm currently challenged to get a vaccine," she said to the Journal News.

Around 30 people were immunized in measles at a county clinic for free on Wednesday.

“I think something needs to be done that people need to be worried, that people have to give up and we have to stop this,” said Renee Kahan, a Rockland resident, who stopped at the clinic. increase attack. "This is a bad situation."

The emergency order, which lasted 30 days, was put in place because people didn't work with health officers working to stop the incident, Thomas Humbach said. T Rockland County Substitute.

Humbach said that police did not stop people and ask for vaccination tables. But if officials recognize that there has been a moneyless person in a public place, then they will be involved in the enforcement of the law, he said. People could be bullied by a serious crime of up to six months in prison.

Gary Siepser, Chief Executive of the Jewish Federation and Rockland Foundation, said the distribution of disease was associated with the anti-influenza movement across the country.

"It is on its journey through social media and parents who are unsure and confused about the importance of immunization," said Siepser. "And it is just happening that there is a group in Rockland County that has bought that."

– AP


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