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Google Stadia links games – but does it really work?



MORE: Now we have all heard of Stadia. A new Google games console aims to allow users to play AAA games in 4K at 60fp, with three-seconds break times. All with just control, screen and internet connection.

Google says that it can do this work by processing all heavy process away from the device to a purpose built data center – a type similar to traditional sports. happens, in a major play-built playroom. So the name.

In theory, it is a strong view. The reality is similar to that of large computer companies or cryptocurrency miners. The construction of industry scale data processing centers in areas where the cost of cheap waste is cheap is a profitable way to process many data.

Who works, very favored, places where energy from the grid is available at low prices, or in places like Australia or Iceland where energy is available free of charge from the grid. well, solar or heat.

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The difference with Stadia is the minute that customers need the result of the process. Game results must be predicted on a local screen within 0.005 seconds of it happening.

This means that playground space is going to be the same, and data centers have to be sufficiently close to all Stadia users on the planet so that the area is comparatively small.

The small number of people who have tested on Stadia has mixed views.

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The small number of people who have tested on Stadia has mixed views.

This is also the separation of flowing currents from a streaming video. Services such as Netflix and Amazon can be down to download and buoyancy on paper over real-time barriers. In play, often a degree of exercise often results in everyday life.

This answer to Google is a little confused. And I don't really buy it. He says that the moderator communicates directly with the games attendants as the Stadium manager is directly connected to the internet.

With Google Stadia, everything you need is just an administrator, a screen and an internet connection.

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With Google Stadia, everything you need is just an administrator, a screen and an internet connection.

Hmm. There is some logic. However, there is no conclusion that this fundamental position is sufficient to allow Stadiums to filter up full-time voluntary gambling flows to millions of users. And unlikely.

Correspondingly, Google has a secure setting in terms of implementing the infrastructure it needs for hitting a latege. But this does need a large amount of measure to beat the global reach.

I suspect that this is a problem that Google needs to rely on a local ISP for his local location.

Which brings us back to an issue that has always been the cause of the internet has been an issue. The digital divide. And I don't just mean from town to a rural village. T It is a problem from a developed nation to a developed nation.

According to the numbers collected by Ookla, the USA was at the registration stage downloaded at 115.14Mbps. New Zealand has an average rating of 87.47Mbps. Where I live – in the cupboard – I'm lucky enough to get over 20Mbps. And tha na Seulan Nua is the high level listed (22nd).

This week's news gives more questions than the answers. We don't know how much it will cost. We do not know when it will be released. We don't know how good their life is. And most, we don't know if it's good.

The small number of people who have tested on Stadia has mixed views. Most agree that it is playing Doom 2016 – the only game Google gave at the demo – that was a satisfying experience. But with Google still so much about everything, we don't even know whether the service opens up to multi-match titles online, or if it is designed only to handle a traditional one-player mode.

David Court: "This week's news gives us more questions than the answers."

JASON DORDAY / STUFF

David Court: "This week's news gives us more questions than the answers."

Despite all of these questions we have one thing that we know. There is no flow. He doesn't even play for play. Add that with the inevitable truth that internet speed is getting faster, and suddenly it's not just looking at the future. Maybe we are looking at a computing future in general.

I'm sure Google – or Microsoft, or Sony, or maybe Amazon – will be one day visiting infinite games through taps. And when they do, they are first-placed until they are the next in computers.

It could lead to a world where consumers pay a little bucks for a new machine which is made up of a HD screen and a battery. Everything else is perfect for services that can be streamed to tools. Free from Lag.

Will Stadia be the first service that will be right? I don't know.


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