Removing the defense of LBGTQ, Jason Kenney is in danger of losing Alberta



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Leader of the United Nations Jason Kenney in front of the Trans Trans Edmonton Medal in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 22 March, 2019.

CANDACE ELLIOTT / Reuters

The Conservative Party at Alberta launched this 14-point plan to reform the education system of the province if it becomes a government after 16 April.

Among the changes are proposed, UCP would reorganize the curriculum to tackle the unprecedented political leadership of the party, Jason Kenney, in his face. The party's financial auditor Drew Barnes complained publicly that there was, therefore, a credit of 42 per cent in a bear at level 9.

“We need to be better,” he said. “That means it has been appropriate for children that 68 per cent of the material they teach in school doesn't know. ”

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With mathematical skills such as these, Albertans prefer that Mr Barnes is not to be a financial minister.

However, the proposed changes to the mathematics program were not at the center of the attention of the UCP. Instead, it was news that the party would have to bring an earlier version in 2014 by the former Conservative, Conservative government. Among other things, the UCP plan would reduce the amount of protection that would be extended to LBGTQ students under current legislation, particularly as they are directly related to direct alliances.

GSA are clubs, as they are known, that allow students who are fashionable or ask their sexual identity or gender to speak to other pupils t which is the same idea. They are considered to be an important environment for students who might be bullied, or need to know that they are not alone in their feelings.

The allies are also seen as an important debate opportunity for students who have not come out of their families.

Under the old law of 2014, school officers had the power to inform parents if their child was attending GSA. This was condemned as a significant breach of the confidentiality of students' rights. Parents aren't happy to hear that their child is attending a club of this kind, and who they might share with them in many ways.

If he is selected, Mr Kenney will arrange for students to be issued, subject to will, if the teacher or principle says he will be the best. I wish that these circumstances could be made.

What is more obvious to me is that this actually takes into account: an attempt by Mr Kenney to overturn that sector of the top-down party in favor of groups faith and some faith schools are opposed to GSA because they believe these clubs will spread their conformity to some degree. (They'll just make their brain!) They want they to stop them. Mr Kenney's policy is a 'way of ensuring': If students feel they could be excluded if they are involved in such a group, they will not attend. Unlocking a solution.

It might just be playing to Mr Kenney's own discrimination. It's said at the time that parents have the right to be informed about what is happening in their children's life, unless there is an opportunity to abuse it. (And how does anyone know for sure how a parent is going to listen to stories their child may have or might be courting?)

He also once encouraged Ralph Klein to use the appeal to influence the High Court's decision to make it illegal for someone based on the side t – maybe something to tell you about too.

It is a terrible policy without now removing the protection offered to LGBTQ students.

Mr Kenney apparently does not think of the need to give the student the status of this protection from a situation that does not accept this reality, prejudice which may be affected or the opposite. very wise to have.

UCP's Head Teacher has to be rejected for the high degree of suicide among LBGTQ students, and an unusually high rate for street children who recognize this approach. He needs to understand that what he is recommending may be worse for this wonderful thing.

Finally, Mr Kenney must ask himself whether he is ready to jeopardize the risk of Alberta over what is a small, vibrant and dynamic move to benefit the interests of a compassionate, non-tolerant minority. . Before a regional election was required, Albertans must also consider that question.

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