The first UK wildcats in the UK open but dairy farmers are not happy to use the & # 39; C word & # 39;



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Her first tartan ceilidh-maker in Britain was surrounded by milk farmers within the opening days for business – for the word & # 39; cheese and use.

La Fauxmagerie, in Brixton, south of London, sells & # 39; craftsmen & crafts made from plant based stores.

This is the first vegan shop for opening in the UK.

But the dairy industry is to stop its shop that has a " Specifying plant materials such as "cheese" saying it's false for shops.

The sisters who launched Dairy UK's branded debates as a "really" and "unnecessary" business.

Rachel Stevens, 26, La Fauxmagerie joined her 30-year-old sister, Charlotte.

He sells a range of chaes – but all who do not eat milk

His shop was very successful with vegaichean who had a great deal. traveled extensively to look at the cheddar, caimmeart, mozzarella and halloumi that won the winners with prize winners.

The sisters, from a rural country in the south of Wales, put their daily work to launch the business.

But within days, an independent business in Brixton Village is "depressed feathers".

The business trade association, Dairy UK, has made a complaint to sisters of deceitful customers by labeling and selling vegan margin; cheese &

But Rachel says that the milk giant's appeal "expresses and" estimates the information "of their customers.

Charlotte opened her business with her sister

She said: "It's clear in our company's name that we sell cheap items for milk – it's a port.

"Our tagline also states that it's a" plant-based cheese fashion ".

"We are not mistaken and the application is that we remove users and provide information on our users.

"Everything seems to be unnecessary, people are usually aware that there are non-milk-making plants.

"Peunut butter does not contain butter and when people want Costa Blanca, they will ask soy milk – not mixed soy meat."

But the couple were criticized for malady & foolish customers;

Former employee Marks and Spencer said: "We expected some attention because we knew we were the first one in the country, but we did not expect feathers to behave.

"Dairy UK sent a letter to the shop. We will take things like they come.

"I understand that people can be uncomfortable because the UK food culture is very fleshy."

Rachel who moved to Baile a 'Chas, south of London, was only four years ago to become a toy full month last year.

But she and her independent lactose sister began to open their own free milk business in autumn.

It was sent to Dairy UK to comment.

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