The first world becomes an HIV patient in the USA



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Nina Martinez, a former placement teacher, has brought the place to life thanks to the efforts of Dr Dorry Segev, and Dr Christine Durand, right.Copyright Photograph
AFP / Getty

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Nina Martinez, a former placement teacher, has brought the place to life thanks to the efforts of Dr Dorry Segev, and Dr Christine Durand, right.

Initially around the world, US doctors have produced a disease of one patient with HIV and others.

It was performed at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, and both patients say they are doing well.

"This is the first time someone living with HIV has been given the opportunity to ever pass the world on," said Dr Dorry Segev in salvation.

It was previously thought that HIV was an acute risk of kidney disease in the donor.

But it is seen that there are new types of retroviral drugs that are used to heal the disease safely for their kidney.

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Dr Christine Durand, Johns Hopkins's medical and oncology partner of the medical practitioner, said the action "challenges the population to see HIV differently", while simultaneously promoting smoking. T .

The patients were extremely grateful for this donation and now we are just examining the long-term outcomes, "said Dr Durand.

The work was done on Monday. Donor Nina Martinez, 35, from Atlanta, said she was "feeling good".

She was encouraged to give her black hand with a program of "Gray's Anatomy," she said, adding that she had been excited to be part of a first medical.

“I knew I was the one they were waiting for,” she said. “For anyone who is thinking of going on this trip, it's impossible.

"I have just shown you how and I am very happy to see what it is next to follow."

Instead, the gentleman chose to live anonymously but it made "beautiful", said Dr Durand.

This improvement continued to bring about further improvement in the management of HIV. In just the second case of this kind, HIV UK patient became "undetectable" after the transfer of original cells earlier in the month.

Around 37 million people were living with HIV / AIDS in 2017, and the World Health Organization continues to keep HIV as “one of the worst challenges in public health in the world”.

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