Supercomputers help a Fire Brigade in a way to go to # 39; The spread of wild waters in California: NPR



Los Angeles Fire Department staff will look at a new fire removal device, led by supercomputers.

Supercomputer Center San Diego


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Supercomputer Center San Diego

Los Angeles Fire Department staff will look at a new fire removal device, led by supercomputers.

Supercomputer Center San Diego

The deadly burning in California has been putting pressure on her; an important part to go away. In the times after a wild runner starts, fire activists must predict where a fire can be spread to save life.

Now, firefighters in California are getting some help from a new powerful device: supercomputers.

Computing servers, who excavate real-time data from the soldiers and weather stations, and # 39; gives a premonition of how wild fires could be transported in the hours.

These strategies could help fire agencies to be a vital summary for removal orders. The Camp fire at a tremendous distance, such as recent fires, were protected by bad weather and warm climate.

"The new thing is something unusual," said Jonathan Cox, regional headquarters with CalFire. "Firefighters have never been a fire 30 years ago."

Compiled to Chomet at the San Diego Supercomputer Center.

Supercomputer Center San Diego


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Supercomputer Center San Diego

Compiled to Chomet at the San Diego Supercomputer Center.

Supercomputer Center San Diego

Combined Fire

Today, fire agencies tell how a fire will move by looking at the weather, the ground and the water supply of fuel, as well as being a? depends on the decades of knowledge of fire analysts.

"This is an inactive science to do during the emergency," said Cox. "So it can be very difficult to get a really good idea of ​​where a fire is going."

Many firearms also use basic laptop software that can make projections of the fire, which has been around for about ten years.

But in recent years, the real-time fire data has been lost. NASA satellites provide detailed images of fire surroundings. The weather station, field cameras and airsets provide even more.

For this type of data, supercomputer can be a great help.

"Comet is called our current computer," said Ilkay Altintas at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at UC San Diego. "Comet is 2.76 petaflops." That's about the same as two million smartphones.

The supercomputer center is on WIFIRE, a model of fire conduct that builds on modules; already and contribute to real-time data. It can run many symbols at the same time, as soon as a fire goes out.

"We can understand where the fire, the level of distribution, the guide for the next two hours," says Personality. "It's very important that that information is in a minute case, in your hand, as soon as possible".

CalFire has been receiving high-tech projections for the Woolsey fire in southern California. A group says that it is still being used experimentally, but it is part of a move that is going on; an increasing number of more technology in fire protection.

"The more information we get and the conclusions we can make based on technology is clear in the future," said Cox.

However, it does not seem to have tools that; replacing human judgment.

"It is another way that we can make decisions, but I do not think it will ever have to replace its human problem because of the dynamics that come with those fires, "he said.

Believe incredible fires

Despite this, there are some wildfires that today's computer models can not predict: those who create the weather itself.

Firefighters in California saw this in July, and hit a Car Fire near Redding. It was "non-visual," according to Calfire, unfortunately released.

He also made a huge "tornado fire" with winds over 160 mph. He asked the life of fire inspector Jeremy Stoke from the Redding Fire Department.

"We've seen a lot of pits that are specifically guided by those winds created by the fire itself," said Janice Coen, a scientist at the National Center for Inflatable Investigation in Colorado.

In these "herding" fires, winds are created by a fire that fires the fire. These winds can be more than 50 miles per hour, although the outdoor winds may be much weaker.

The current fire handling models do not report in their statements.

"In some of the worst, most important issues, they will come short," said Coen.

Coen is working on a computing modal that combines climate with fire, known as CAWFE. She says that a promise has been made, but a hard part is being taken to fire agencies, because new technology is being used; threatening them.

"It's difficult to introduce new technology in firearms in particular," she said.

The ability, which she says, is that communities in fire areas are slightly safer.

"I have a lot of hope that we can understand fires and avoid the expectations of our behavior so that we can learn from it and avoid further collisions," she said.


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